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Weeds Controlled

Resicore® corn herbicide gives you long-lasting residual control of tough weeds

Resicore® corn herbicide gives you long-lasting residual control of tough weeds including those that could be herbicide-resistant to glyphosate, atrazine or other ALS herbicides. It’s the power you need to keep your fields cleaner longer — so you can protect your yield potential.

  • Palmer Amaranth
  • Giant Ragweed
  • Waterhemp
  • Morningglory
  • Marestail
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Palmer Amaranth

Palmer Amaranth

Palmer amaranth can lead to corn yield loss of up to 91% when allowed to compete throughout the growing season.

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Palmer Amaranth

Palmer amaranth can lead to corn yield loss of up to 91% when allowed to compete throughout the growing season.

Adapts quickly

Spreads herbicide-resistant genes.

Prolific production of small seeds

A single female plant can produce approximately 600,000 seeds, which are rapidly spread through grain, seed, feed or equipment contamination.

Competes aggressively

Palmer amaranth is the most competitive and aggressive pigweed species; it can grow 2 or 3 inches per day.

Extended emergence period

Observed from early May until mid-September.

Herbicide resistence

Populations have evolved with resistance to ALS inhibitors, triazines, HPPD inhibitors, dinitroanilines and glyphosate.

Source: Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service, takeactiononweeds.com

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Giant Ragweed

Giant Ragweed

Just two giant ragweed plants per 110 square feet can reduce corn yield by 13%.

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Giant Ragweed

Just two giant ragweed plants per 110 square feet can reduce corn yield by 13%.

Produces many seeds

A single plant can produce up to 3,500 seeds per square yard in corn production areas.

Competes aggressively

Due to early emergence, rapid growth and large, 4- to 8-inch leaf area; giant ragweed plants are often 1 to 5 feet taller than competing crops.

Extended emergence period

Possibly emerge from March through late July.

Herbicide resistence

ALS inhibitor resistance was first confirmed in Indiana, Illinois and Ohio in the 1990s and early 2000s. Glyphosate resistance has been confirmed in more than 11 states across the Midwest and southern United States. Plant populations with resistance to both ALS inhibitors and glyphosate have been found in Ohio, Minnesota, Missouri and Indiana.

Source: Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service, takeactiononweeds.com

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Waterhemp

Waterhemp

Waterhemp is the first U.S. weed to develop resistance to three sites of action.

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Waterhemp

Waterhemp is the first U.S. weed to develop resistance to three sites of action.

Adapts quickly

Spreads herbicide-resistant genes; pollen can travel ½ mile or farther under windy conditions.

Extended emergence period

Emerges throughout the growing season; seeds can remain viable in the soil for several years.

Produces many seeds

More than 1 million seeds per plant when not competing with a crop. Competes aggressively: Early season competition from a heavy infestation reduced corn yield by 15% by the time the waterhemp was 6 inches tall.1

Herbicide resistence

Resistance to five modes of action documented: ALS inhibitors, triazines, diphenyl ethers (protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) inhibitors), HPPD inhibitors and glyphosate.

Source: Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service
1Cordes, J. C., W. G. Johnson, P. Scharf, and R. J. Smeda. 2004. Late-emerging common waterhemp (Amaranthus rudis) interference in conventional tillage corn. Weed Technol. 18(4): 999–1005.

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Morningglory

Morningglory

There are several species of annual morningglory in Midwest agronomic cropping systems, including tall (Ipomoea purpurea), ivyleaf (I. hederacea) and pitted (I. lacunosa) species.

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Morningglory

There are several species of annual morningglory in Midwest agronomic cropping systems, including tall (Ipomoea purpurea), ivyleaf (I. hederacea) and pitted (I. lacunosa) species.

Growth habits

They cause issues by climbing or vining up crops and have the ability to grow and reproduce on the soil surface.

Late emergence

Emerges in late spring after many herbicide residuals have dissipated.

Competes aggressively

Vine growth and sprawling growth habit choke out desirable plants and hinder harvesting efficiency by twining around crop plants.

Herbicide resistence

Morningglory always has been hard to control with glyphosate.

Sources: Purdue University Department of Agriculture, Botany and Plant Pathology; University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources

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Marestail

Marestail

In addition to overwintering, marestail has two emergence periods that can complicate control efforts: late March through June and late summer into fall.

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Marestail

In addition to overwintering, marestail has two emergence periods that can complicate control efforts: late March through June and late summer into fall.

Overwintering

Marestail plants overwinter in the rosette stage through late April, followed by stem elongation (bolting). Marestail is most easily controlled when in the seedling or rosette stage. Therefore, in no-till situations, burndown herbicides should be applied prior to bolting.

Easily spread seeds

Plants can produce up to 200,000 seeds that are transported by wind, providing for effective spread of herbicide-resistant populations.

Herbicide resistence

Many populations of marestail are resistant to glyphosate. Cases of multiple resistance to glyphosate and ALS-inhibiting herbicides have been confirmed. Control in corn can be accomplished through tilling.

Source: Purdue University Department of Agriculture, Botany and Plant Pathology

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Resicore controls more than 70 other broadleaf weeds and grasses in corn. See the list